Beach Fishing around Destin, Fl

You can catch a fish from just about anywhere along the beaches of Destin. Unlike the dry land, the waters and sea bottom
changes almost daily along the beach, so there is no permanent "honey hole". Most people pick a beach to fish for its easy
access and the lack of other people, ie swimmers.

There are a few permanent structures you need to be aware of when fishing the beach. These structures area the sandbars
formed by the waves and wind. These sand bars parallel the shoreline of the beach as can be seen from the picture below.
You will normally have two bars at all times, simply called the
INNER and OUTER BARS. At high tide, you will sometimes
have a third bar form close to the shore, called the
SHORE BAR. In between the bars are the TROUGHS.
Fishing Destin Guide©
Fishing the beach around Destin





A local's guide to fishing around Destin and the
Florida Panhandle  
   

This web site is updated as I have time from other things going on. As there are a 1000 + different ways to do things, this is only
my way of fishing, nothing else,  and it is not the last word in fishing the area. I am by no means an expert but if you would like my opinion on something related to fishing the area,
please email me at
FishingDestinGuide@cox.net.  It may take a few days before I get to it, so be patient. Thanks.....

© Copyright  2018 Fishing Destin Guide
All rights reserved     
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Known as the "luckiest fishing village", Destin is the home to some of the best saltwater fishing in the United States. The 100 Fathom  (600' depth) Curve of the Gulf of Mexico
draws closer to Destin than any other spot in Florida. This, along  with  Destin's close  proximity  to  the East  Pass, allows quick access to the Gulf of Mexico's  fishing bounty.  The  
purpose  of  this site  is  to acquaint a new fisherman  to  the Destin area  -  our local facilities, fish, waters and fishing methods. Tight lines and good fishing!

Fishing the beach around Destin, Florida
Surf Conditions
INNER BAR
OUTER BAR
And sometimes, you will have a third bar
forming just a few feet from the edge of
the water. You can find whiting in here
sometimes.
Cobia patrol in April parallel to the outer bar. Camera distorts the distance some, its a
good 100 yards to the boats from the dry sand.
These sand bars are what the fish key on. During the spring migration from the south during the spring, Cobia follow the outer
bar, usually travelling from east to west. Schools of pompano will run in between the bars and come into the breaking waves
to feed. A lot of fish can be found on the outside of the outer bar. This is where you will see the porpoises. And sharks.
Schools of bait fish can be seen just outside of the outer bar and following the trough between the  inner and outer bar.
Where there are bait fish, there are predators. The Whiting like to be close to shore, sometimes within a few feet of dry sand.
So the key is to locate the fish.  You really can't reach the outer bar from shore unless you wade a long ways out and can cast
a county mile. Your best bet would be to try the trough between the inner and outer bars. And to just outside of the where the
waves are breaking if you can get your line to hold.
Sometimes you will have scallops forming in
the sand of the beach. If you can find one of
these, walk out on the tip of the scallop and
and fish the pool formed by it and the
entrance into the pool.
Other times the seas will be dead calm or a
neap tide. You want moving water, thats
when the fish feed. I have never caught
anything with the seas like this. Some
people say they have. If you want to fish
from the shore under these conditions, get
your bait out as far as you can. Or go to the
jetties.
The inner bar can be located by noting where
the waves start to break close to shore. You
usually can walk out to it and it will only be a
few feet deep on it
.
The outer bar is usually noted by a color
change in the water but during periods of
high winds or waves, you will also have the
waves breaking on it.

Outside of this you will find the big guys,
King Mackerel, sharks, etc. Usually several
hundred feet from shore, but fish will swim
parallel to it on the inside and outside.
(Mainly outside though)
During the spring (March through May), you
will see the boats patrolling just outside the
outer bar looking for Cobia that swim parallel
to the bar.
In the summer, about your only chance to
fish from the shore would be to wade out to
the inner bar and fish from it
Note color change at the outer bar


Fishing
the
beach
around
Destin,
Florida
INNER BAR
SHORE BAR
SHORE BAR
INNER BAR
INNER BAR
SHORE BAR
INNER BAR
SHORE BAR
INNER BAR
INNER BAR
INNER BAR
SHORE BAR  (aka the Lip)
INNER BAR
SHORE BAR
SHORE BAR AT LOW TIDE (aka the Lip)
OUTER BAR
OUTER BAR
SHORE BAR  (aka the Lip)
The beach at Destin in the summer tourist
months.

Note the "scalloping" of the sand at the
water's edge
SCALLOP
Standing on the inner bar at low tide
in the winter months. Water levels are
lower during the winter months.
TROUGH
aka GUT
TROUGH
aka GUT
OUTER BAR
OUTER BAR
OUTER BAR
   A "scallop" at low tide  
CUT
NAVARRE BEACH, just west of Destin -
Note the scalloping of the beach sand at the waters edge.
You can clearly see the CUTS throught the inner bar.
That is the old Navarre pier that was damaged by
Hurricanes Ivan and Dennis in 2004 and 2005,
respectively.
PANAMA CITY BEACH, just east of Destin
I believe this is the Dan Russell City Pier
at Pier Park. Note the "June Grass" located
just outside the Inner Bar
Changing ocean on the beach at the old Crystal Beach Pier at the Pompano St public access point.
INNER BAR
OUTER BAR
OUTER BAR
INNER BAR
JUNE GRASS -  During the summer, you
need to be aware of the dreaded "June
Grass". Simply stated, when the June
Grass is in, you can not fish the beach as
it covers your line, bait, everything.

It is an algae which gets it name because
it starts showing up in the warmer months,
ie; J
une Grass. Technically, it is a
filamentous green algae from the
Cladophora genus.

I have seen it come in as early as April.
And it can stay as as long as September.It
appears and disappears overnight and is
largely driven by the winds. A north wind
will take it away from the shore while a
south wind will bring it close to shore.

It moves in patches. Destin may be
covered in it while Navarre has none. You
can check these web sites for more
information. Some web sites have been
started to keep an eye on the stuff. Check
them out.
Yum Yum
Probably not a good
day to go fishing on the beach

(
Hurricane  Gustav, August 1, 2007)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------OUTER BAR - Noter slight water color change
INNER BAR
Shore Bar